Jun 082015
 

A bruised reed he will not break, and a faintly burning wick he will not quench.

Isaiah 42:3 (ESV)

One of the great encouraging words from the prophet Isaiah comes in chapter 42. The prophet Isaiah, under the inspiration of the Spirit, presents Christ to us as the servant who will not break a bruised reed and will not quench a faintly burning wick. In Matthew’s account of the Gospel, he takes us back to this text to describe the ministry of our Savior in 12:18-21. The servant, chosen by God, is Jesus. The great love of God for His people is seen in the fact that He called His Son to save and serve the elect and the Son executes the offices of their Prophet, Priest and King.

Are you a bruised reed or a faintly burning wick today? Are you weak and tired? Do you feel like you are barely hanging on? Do you ever wonder how you will make it through another day and do you have difficulty believing that ‘God loves me like this?’ Does it seem that God has forgotten or that He doesn’t care?

The invitation of our Servant was spoken (as a prophet the greater Moses speaks) tenderly in Matthew 11:28, “Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.” And in Isaiah 55:1, “Come, everyone who thirsts, come to the waters; and he who has no money, come, buy and eat! Come, buy wine and milk without money and without price.” In Isaiah 53 we read that the Servant, our Great High Priest, is wounded for our transgressions and bruised for our iniquities.

We see in this verse the condition of those He came to rescue: weak reeds and faintly burning wicks. He came to rescue those who were not impressive in the eyes of the world. He came to rescue the broken and needy, the desperate and despised.

The Puritan Richard Sibbes wrote a masterpiece of a book entitled The Bruised Reed. The Puritans were so wise in giving care to one another’s souls. In his book he asks, “Who are the bruised reeds?”, to which he answers, they are those not only that are brought low by the burdens of life, but who by them are brought to see their sin, which bruises most of all (my paraphrase).

Yes, we go through God’s bruising, and in them our sin rises to the surface. That hurts! So it is this text above that encourages me. The bruised reed he will not break and the faintly burning wick he will not blow out. Listen to Sibbes here: “For our encouragement to a thorough work of bruising, and patience under God’s bruising of us, let us all know that none are fitted for comfort than those that think themselves furthest off.” Christ’s sheep are weak sheep. But He seeks them, calls them, is tender to them, feeds them, loves them, and heals their broken hearts. He is very familiar with souls bruised by sin and gently restores them. Look at Peter’s failures. He denied Christ three times and yet three times Christ said to him, “Feed my sheep.” Peter forsook Christ at the cross and Christ said following his resurrection, “Go your way, tell his disciples, and Peter.” Our Savior is so patient and kind and gentle. Let us praise God for the faithful ministry of his chosen Servant in the lives of his sheep.

Broken, yet healed in Christ,

Pastor Bill

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